Anita's Haven

books, thoughts, stories, poetry, interviews, writing

A fun new children’s funbook!

It is funny how giddy I feel over this new project!

This is a special funbook edition of the story Winky’s Colours, prepared by the author who is also a teacher and a parent. Apart from the original story about Winky, this funbook is also filled with worksheets, riddles, colouring pages and wordgames, and all the illustrations are black&white. Have fun!

Winky is a little penguin who lives his life with a black&white family in nature filled with black, white and gray. All he dreams of are colours! So one day he decides to leave his home and go on an expedition to find colours. He will meet friends, face life-risking adventure and find more than he expected.
#childrensbook #learning

bit.ly/2Dbivyl

Advertisements
Leave a comment »

Rhino Magic

An excerpt from Rhino Magic, my story in Looking into the Abyss:

‘Mummie, mummie, come here quickly! You’ve got to see this!’

Ginger dragged her feet from the kitchen to the living room for the hundredth time that day. There was no gingerly step left in her to justify her name, not after a sleepless night spent trying to get her son’s fever down.

‘What, honey?’

She struggled to sound interested, and failed miserably. Jake was kneeling on the bed and pointing at the TV, his blurred eyes sparkling with excitement, above the gloomy eyebags and thin cheeks.

He used to be so big and strong that they called him their beast. No seven-year-old should have to suffer kidney problems.

‘The man in the show… the documentary… he said the rhino is considered to be the unicorn’s cousin. Unicorn! Can you believe it?’

Thank you for inviting me onto this project, @Paul White.

#love #education #storytelling #quote #charity #books #teaching #story
moon-1982890_1280

41XbyEPKDGL._AC_US327_QL65_

Leave a comment »

Parents’ Alert

shame-799099_1280

Not so long ago, a friend of mine found her son in front of his laptop, in bitter tears and literally afraid for his life. An older boy from his school was sending him threatening and hurtful messages over a social network, on behalf of himself and a bunch of his bullying buddies. Her son was not only afraid to leave the house, but sat there as if paralysed in front of the screen, his fists clenched so firmly that his knuckles were white. No amount of consoling, coaxing or even threatening helped my friend – her son would simply not reveal the real name of his abuser, masked behind a clipart avatar and a fashionably misspelled username. But most mothers whose children are attacked don’t just back out, and very few obstacles manage to slow them down. Single mothers even more so, and my friend is one.

Like a proper lioness, she gave her son a chocolate bar, some cocoa and a pep talk, gently stroked his hair and put him in bed, playing his favourite music really low till he fell asleep. She acted calm before the storm. Then she sat at the desk and opened her son’s profile. A couple of hours later, having done some online detective work she had never deemed herself capable of, she had the bully’s full name and surname, his home address and his private cellphone number. And she hadn’t even broken any laws. The problem with bullies and all criminals is their ego; they are never really ashamed of their actions and always secretly want the whole world to know them for their deeds. So they leave a trail of breadcrumbs one only has to follow. She did exactly that. Looking at her son twitch and sweat in sleep, mumble defensive phrases in his nightmare, and unconsciously cry despite his early teenage years and strong body, she grabbed her cellphone and typed in the bully’s number. Before tapping the call button, she left her son’s room and closed the door behind her.

She phoned the bully. He answered. She introduced herself and then, with all the raging storm she had in her, she spoke her mind, letting the bully know she knew who he was and where he lived, ordering him to stop contacting her son, and threatening what she would do if he didn’t stop. I don’t know exactly what she said, and I guess neither does she any more. Protecting loved ones, especially children, brings out the best and worst in us, and controlling that is usually impossible. The point is – she succeeded. She never spoke to the boy’s parents about this. It turns out she knows from the neighbourhood; they are exactly the behavioural matrix their son so loyally copies. She never told her son what she did. But he is not bullied any more, sleeps well and goes out with his friends, like all happy children should. She is not happy. She is alert.

What would you do? There are so many options for parents in this case, some depending on the laws of your country, some on the culture and tradition you come from, but what it all comes down to is your definitive parental decision. You are the one who chooses to act and faces the results.

cub-1422073_1280

Would you tell your son to ‘take it like a man’ and fight back? Battle a group of bullies, bigger and older than him, all alone and empty-handed? Would you resort to violence yourself, get a gang of thugs and beat the boys’ senseless and their parents as well? Would you go to the press or the Internet and make the story go viral, dragging you and your son through the merciless scrutiny of the public eye, which only seems to feed on the negative and rarely offers any real help or solution? Would you tell your child to talk to friends or call a helpline, washing your hands of the responsibility?

You could choose not to act. Just sit tight, waiting for the whole thing to pass on its own. It seems easier to do anyway. But it isn’t easy, and it won’t pass. Dirt piled up under a rug doesn’t go away, it doesn’t dissolve, and nobody else comes to clean house. Sooner or later, you or your loved ones stumble over it and fall flat on your face. Unresolved bullying only gets worse, spreads to more people, leaves your child out there like an open target, a sitting duck, with an invisible ‘open season’ sign hanging over his head. And your child remains a victim. Or, for better or worse(which do you think?), becomes a bully himself, vindicating his own suffering by tormenting others.

You could do exactly what my friend did – go directly to the source and deal with the bully. You could get lucky, exactly like she did, the word ‘lucky’ used very loosely here, because there is no win-win situation where violence is concerned. She could have been in trouble though. The bully could have told his parents, they could have attacked her, they could have sewed her for contacting their underage son without their knowledge and threatening him. They could even have won in court, depending on who had the money for a slicker lawyer. Her son could have been badly hurt by the bullies for having his mummy come to the rescue. But if you weigh all those options before your parental instinct kicks in, you are probably late already.

You could contact the school authorities. It is their duty, after all, to handle such issues on school premises. They have trained professionals for such situations. It would take time, you would drag your son and his friends through questioning, the bully’s parents would be contacted, and then it would be just like a trial all over again. Or maybe not. Maybe the whole team of adults involved int he problem really would work together in the best interest of all the children, and the bully would get help and stop being a bully, whereas the bullied would relax and heal, and future similar situations would be prevented or, at least, reduced. Well, you never know until you try, right?

What would you do? What do you do?

Leave a comment »

Patches by Kathryn Curzon – my review

What a wonderful, soothing, therapeutic story for children, but also adults, on how to help someone dealing with sadness. A beautifully told narrative about a kind, loving woodland creature who finds someone so sad he or she is practically invisible, and then, bit by bit, day by day, not forcing it but being there… patch by patch, sadness is gone and friendship heals hope. Lovely metaphor with imagery suitable for children. I enjoyed reading this, and I congratulate the author on managing to sustain a picturesque and serene tone, inviting to be read, maybe not out loud, but with a loving whisper. Recommended to all.

This book on Amazon

Leave a comment »

Yahooty Who? – my review

I stumbled upon this cute book in my search and downloaded it based on the very optimistic cover and blurb.

Although primarily driven by beautiful illustrations and a cute little house ‘elf’ Yahooty, the wonderful visual aspect of the story is accompanied successfully with lovely rhyme, which flows smoothly for the most part. The story itself does not contain a traditional plot, but is phrased as suggestive questions for the little readers (or listeners). I enjoyed the playful tone, lots of useful vocabulary which will help expand the children’s own, and the repetitive pattern which will definitely engage the kids.

Yahooty must be in kahootz with parents though, especially regarding certain house cleaning tasks, so a parent might even get the idea to get kids to help with cleaning in hopes of actually meeting Yahooty. Just sayin’;).

Book link

PS: found this on their Twitter:

Leave a comment »

Learn back from your children

Parenting

Plant a kiss on your daughter’s forehead
One that says all is well
Even when it’s not
Even when she sees it’s not
But make her believe it
It’s your job
You are her home
Her safe haven
Her parent.

Stroke your son’s hair in passing
A touch that encourages
Even when you have no courage
Even when you feel so weak
But make him believe it
It’s your job
You are his home
His safe haven
His parent.

And when she chirps around happily
With the smile of a thousand suns
Confident beyond any borders
And as tireless as spring
Be proud of your achievement
Don’t be shocked
Don’t be surprised
You’ve taught her life’s joy
Now it’s time to learn back from your daughter.

And when he dares to do the stuff he fears
And when he persists after defeat
Stubborn and brave and happy
And eager to make you proud
Be proud of your achievement
Don’t be tired
Don’t feel drained
You’ve taught him life’s battles
Now it’s time for you to learn back from your son.

Believe it
It’s your job
They are your home
Your safe haven
Your children.

2 Comments »

Happy Mother’s Day! Take a nap!

For all the parents out there, especially those who, like my hubbie and me have children who considered sleeping a waste of time, so much so that we dreaded the process of putting them to bed – a comical motherly approach:).

By the way, didn’t you just hate those smug parents who claimed they had so much free time while their kid slept like a log? Free time? Really? What on earth is that?

Free Time

I finally have
A day off from work,
So it’s just the daily routine,
No one goes berserk.

But my heart is pounding
And she feels my fear.
Both she and I know
That nap-time is near.

We’ve done the yummy,
She’s had her bath,
The massage, the cuddling,
The story book path.

Changed the bedsheets this morning,
The music is low.
It’s time to relax
And to dreamland go.

Let’s kiss her cheek
And in her crib she can lie.
I’ll give her the Bambi
And say bye-bye.

She looks at me sternly,
With wide open eyes.
I just know in a second
I’ll be hearing her cries.

So I sit and pretend
I am reading a book,
But I just can’t resist
Taking a look.

She’s quietly hugging
Her bottle of milk
And curling softly
Her fair hair of silk.

And I feel such relief
As I sit in my chair.
Let’s just have some coffee
And breathe some calm air.

She should nap for an hour,
Or more if I’m blessed,
Let’s see what I can do
In that time – unstressed.

I could dust the whole house,
Or at least one room
For you can see my dust for miles
Without any zoom.

But wait! What’s that?
Is she sleeping or not?
Is that moaning I hear?
Is that a problem she’s got?

‘Oh mommy, come back,
You can’t leave me here.
I’m so little, come hug me,
Chase away every fear.’

My drama queen starts
Her anti-nap show.
It will last and last,
This I just know.

‘Mommy is here,
Go back to sleep.
And Bambi is here,
And his dreams are deep.

Here’s a big, big hug
And another kiss, too.
Don’t worry, dear, mommy
Is looking after you.’

A sob and a blink,
And she’s lying again.
Perhaps this time it works
And she reaches her zen.

I’m back in my plan-mode,
Stitching a sock.
The laundry is on now,
And I glance at the clock.

If she sleeps now,
I can just finish lunch,
And some work brought home,
As there’s always a crunch.

And minutes like hours
To me they can seem.
There’s so much to do,
But she just won’t dream.

For she’s back on her feet now
With a loud complaint.
She bangs on her crib fence.
(She might hit her head and faint!)

‘Oh mommy, you’re here!
What’s that over there?’
As her chubby fingers follow
Her smiling stare.

‘It’s a photo of your brother,
Just like every other day.
Now lie down and sleep,
And please, just – stay!’

‘Oh mom, before you go,
Can I just have a hug,
And I promise I’ll sleep
As snug as a bug.’

Her smile is like honey
So I quickly fly back,
And I hug her and kiss her,
And touch the curl on her neck.

And I lay her back gently.
She closes her eyes.
And I go back to work some,
But she soon screams and cries.

‘Bad dream, bad dream!
Hold me some more.
Take me in your arms
And close that door.’

And I curl up with her
On our big family bed,
And I sing to her and pat
Her warm little head.

I almost fall asleep,
Waiting for her to relax,
When she chuckles and wakes
And once again asks:

‘Oh mommy, please tell me,
what’s that in your nose?
And when I poke your eye,
Why’s it red like a rose?

Oh and, by the way, mommy,
Can’t we just read and play?
It’s so boring to lie down
And do nothing all day!’

‘But you must sleep, dear,
so your body can grow.
You’re just a baby,
You need sleep, you know.’

‘But what if I miss stuff
While I’m taking a nap?
Plane sounds or a phone call,
A fly buzz or jingle rap?

It’s so dull here in bed-
Nothing to smash, chew or push!
And you’re no fun either.
And you keep saying shush.’

‘Come to the kitchen with me
and let’s check on our meal!
But then – it IS bedtime!’
‘OK, mum, it’s a deal!’

My back is so sore,
But I carry her there,
Lunch is ready, work can wait,
She’s the one who needs care.

We go back to her crib,
She lies smiling and content,
And she closes her eyes.
(Will I regret and repent?)

I’m almost at the door,
But it’s ‘Mommy, mommy, mommy!’
‘What now???’ ‘A bellybutton –
right here on my tummy!’

After finding mine,
She’s out like a light,
But if I want it to last,
I’ll keep my fingers crossed tight.

Quick! Do I still have time?
Wash my hair, legs need wax,
For when hubbie gets home
He’ll be wanting some sex.

Boy, she’s sleeping – a wonder!!!
Can I still fix son’s shoes?
He messed up the bottoms
When he fell and got bruised.

He’ll be back in ten minutes
From his playtime with a pal!
Hope he doesn’t come screaming
And wakes up my sweet gal!

‘Hey, mom, I am home!
What’s for lunch? Starving here!’
There he is, and so is she-
Wide awake with a sneer!

But OK, I’ve done stuff!
One leg waxed, and hair wet,
Laundry done, work delayed,
But a simple lunch is set.

Kids are chatting and smiling,
Even hubbie is home.
As for me, well, at least-
I made this li’l old poem!

Leave a comment »

THE DRAGON DREAMER by J. S. Burke – my review

Combining two of my most favourite elements, the ocean and fantasy, has certainly not put this author in an easy spot with me as a reader. My expectations were really high.

The author’s fascination with sealife is obvious, and it is intriguing how she intertwines it with the dragon world. There is so much lovely detail in the descriptions, and almost a science to it. I enjoyed the author’s comparison of the daily rituals of sea and dragon life with the human perspective. In fact, most of the story can be taken as a metaphor to our world, even the environmental issues, conflict and the importance of stories for the growth of a species. Although there are absolutely no human characters in this story (which took some time for me to get used to), all the characters and their relationships are developed well, with lots of love and respect. The weather threats and action sequences are intense, but it is the life described that I particularly enjoyed. This entire world has been created with amazing consistency and attention to detail.

The admirable symbiosys of skills from completely different creatures, shows us how humans should learn, united by a common goal – life on this planet. And how interesting it is that the author has both species celebrate and encourage art, creativity and healing, in contrast to humans! Dreamers they are, truly.

Any child or adult who loves to explore and go on nature adventures, will thoroughly enjoy comparing this fantasy world to nature lessons at school. Teachers could find it useful in dealing with biology, environment, even art. If your child has the heart of a zoologist, oceanologist, artist, and is a fantasy fan, this book might just be perfect for them.

What I especially liked in the story is the strong emphasis on learning and communication – each species can learn from another when willing to communicate.

Here is an interesting quote, one I wish we could implement to human life more often.

“…crowding can lead to fights. Art is good way to channel all that edgy energy.”

Dragon Dreamer

1 Comment »

Special and Peculiar

My cousin had Down Syndrome. All she ever gave anyone was love, smiles, hugs, cuddling, friendship and kindness. All she ever cried about was cruelty, abuse, violence and anger.

All I feel when I remember her is love, smiles, hugs, cuddling, friendship and kindness.

Giant

There is a little giant

Hidden inside your heart.

He is good and fun,

And kind and honest,

And powerful and brave.

He is your secret,

But he is not your shame.

He is your secret weapon.

He is your superpower.

You have to let him do his job.

Just let him shine within you

And lurk through your eyes.

And no bad words,

And no violence,

And no illness

Will harm you.

(This poem of mine appeared in an international anti-bullying charity book Inner Giant.)

2 Comments »

What do YOU have to say? – interview with Lieve Snellings

Lieve Snellings is an author and photographer I first became acquainted with through her nature books for children via Readers Review Room. It is a pleasure to have her over as a guest.

INTRO ABOUT LIEVE SNELLINGS

Lieve Snellings is a retired freelance photographer who lives in Leuven (Belgium).

Her series of picture books ‘Nature in Quebec, Pictures of Astonishing Wildlife’ count now 2 books, available in Dutch, English and French. Her children’s books are featured with whimsical photo- illustrations of wildlife, she took herself in Quebec.

Lieve Snellings became ‘BookGoSocial Top Voted Children’s Author 2017’ and ‘Readers Review Room’s Author of the Month October 2017’.

Her images illustrated many books, magazines and were published online. Her photos were shown in exhibitions all over the world.

Since 2008, after meeting up with her partner who lives in Quebec, you can find her for about 5 months a year in Canada. There she became a passionate nature photographer. She spent hours, weeks… Observing wildlife and searched every info she could find. This and her imagination made her publish two children’s books in which photos are as important as words.
Her stories take the traditional picture book experience and transform it by replacing illustrations by her own nature photography. The books are written in her mother tongue Dutch and translated in English and French.

Name: Lieve Snellings

Book(s): Margot gets an unexpected visit; Groundhog Secrets, Everything You Always Wanted To Know About Woodchucks

Genre(s): Picture Books featured with whimsical photo illustrations of wildlife
Day-job: Retired social worker/dispatcher at the Emerency Room Department. Passionale photographer.
Likes: Life and ice cream
Dislikes: beetroot and violence
Favourite virtue: passion and persistence
Favourite sin or fault: ice cream
Favourite quote: It’s better to lose yourself in your passion, than to lose your passion.
Favourite movie: Hidden Figures
Favourite song: Gracias a la vida by Mercedes Sosa and Joan Baez

INTERVIEW TIME

1. Welcome to Anita’s Haven. Pull up a chair, relax and fire away. Firstly, tell us five things about yourself that you think matter the most.

  • I am very happy that I was born
  • I think I can say that once I started something, I know the word persistence
  • I love children and nature
  • I see creatures in everything around me when I look at clouds, trees, water, dirt on the street, timber… I think it is the inner child that directs my eyes in a certain direction
  • I love connecting with people

2. When you were a kid, what did you want to do in life as an adult? Can you remember the moment you realized you had become an author? How did it feel to transcend from that point when you just wrote for yourself to the point when you realized this was what you wanted to do full time?

When I was a child, I didn’t dream to become a writer. I wanted to become a world champion in bicycle and then I would buy a big apartment in South Africa, in which half of the habitants would be black and the other half white. And so in my dream they had to learn to live together.

As many teenagers, I wrote poems as a way to express myself. But I didn’t think of me as a poet nor an author.

Later I became a social worker and photographer. And in the solidarity world, I heard so many times that white people talked about others, what they went through etc. I was interested in what these people wanted to tell themselves. So in photoreports and presentations, f.i. about Nicaragua, Bosnia, India… I wanted to let them do the talking themselves…
Maybe that’s the reason, that in my books, Margot the groundhog became the narrator of her own life.

3. Why do you write? What’s the most challenging aspect of your genre? Which genre can you never see yourself writing and why? How do you feel when you write? Is there a special ritual to it, a playlist, place, company, technology?

Why do you write?

This is a good question why do I write books? And it will be so different than for other writers, because I do it, in the first place, because I’m a photographer. Photographing nature was so good for my soul. And when I realized I had so many amazing photos of all those Quebecois animals and birds, I started thinking that these images could help reveal the beauty of nature to all kids, small and big ones. Making a children’s picture book seemed to me the best way to do so. Only my picture books would be different from others, because I would work with my own photos.

And it is that aspect that is the most challenging, I didn’t find much other picture books based on real photos. My work is a sort of special, something very different, in the big children’s book genre of picture books.

4. Which genre can you never see yourself writing and why?

I don’t like horror. Writing about something is going deeper into the story. I can not do that with horror.

5. How do you feel when you write?

When I write and do the graphics, featuring my books with whimsical photo- illustrations of wildlife, I took myself, in Quebec, I feel so exciting, I really can hear and see Margot talking, at that moment I live in another world…

6. Is there a special ritual to it, a playlist, place, company, technology?

I start with a general, vague idea. Then making a first selection of photos, see what these images tell me, what is the story that comes up… write the words down… After that, I start to create the illustrations in photoshop, add text and stuff, which can be different than my original words on paper. And so go step by step…

The photos play a very important role in the creation.

7. Tell us more about your book characters. Who inspired you for the heroes and villains? Who is your favourite character and why?

After spending some days with my godchild’s daughters in Belgium, I flew back to Quebec and suddenly it became clear to me. I can make a children’s book with these girls as main character together with Eufrazie the squirrel. But sitting again in our backyard, I saw Margot the groundhog waking up after her hibernation. At some or another way she made it all clear and told me ‘No, it’s not about Eufrazie, it is about me, Margot, that you have to write your book and and you have to show my pictures.’

I don’t know how she did it. But Margot the groundhog made me change my plans and give her the main role in the books, and that is the reason I more and more started to love her, she is such a strong character, she knows what she wants and goes after it.

5. We all know typing those special words, the end, gives us a priceless feeling, but that is when the actual work begins. How do you deal with the editing process? Are you your toughest editor and beta-reader or do you rely on someone for that?

I do have some beta-readers who go with me through the process. At the end, I asked an author-editor to read it. This is how I ended up with two books instead of one (My very first edition both books were worked out in one big picture book).

In the beginning, it was tough and I didn’t quite understand. But then a 10 year old girl made it all clear to me after I asked her to read. She said ‘one part in the book is more a story for kids a bit younger than me, but then this part with all the tidbits on groundhogs, I’m sure even my sister, who is 12, will enjoy that. And exactly this was it my first editor wanted to point out for me. And so I ended up with 2 books instead of one. After that process, they were both edited by a friend writer-publisher.

Another big job was the translation. I had a translator into French and into English. And after the translators had done their job, an editor came in and changes were made in agreement between translator, editor and me.

6. How much do praise and positive reviews help to fuel your creativity and keep you writing? How do negative reviews affect you?

Positive reviews give me, of course a boost, it’s like the fire of passion in myself gets some extra air and grow. Of course I also got critics. The first moments are a bit difficult, but then I let it lay down on me and after a while I can see what I can learn from it. And that pleases me then too.

7. What do you do when you are not writing books? Any hobbies or projects you are particularly passionate about?

I am a photographer, so that’s my big passion. I am also a women’s peace activist and member of Women in Black (WiB), an international network of feminists against violence and war and for peace. In Leuven we have a silent vigil every week.

I like reading, watching TV, films and hanging out with friends and family.

8. If you could be any famous book character, who would you be and why?

I like Pipi Langkous because she is so funny and full of energy and every problem is for her a challenge.

9. What’s the funniest or most interesting reaction you’ve had from people when you told them you were a writer?

I didn’t get a reaction that was funny nor weird that I still remember 🙂

10. If you could interview any famous person in human history, who would it be and what would you ask?

There are different famous persons in human history I would like to meet, but if just one person, I would choose Maya Angelou.

I would thank her for her poem ‘I rise’.

11. Would you like to add anything, share a brief sneak peek into your book, or send a message to the readers?

If you want to get astonished by the beauty of nature and a slight of humor…

Then the Margot books are really something for you!

Have fun reading and looking at the pictures.

QUICK POP-QUIZ

Dogs or cats – CATS cats know very well what they want and they go for it

Ice-cream or fruit – ICE-CREAM I could do a death-sin for ice cream

Meat or salad – SALAD I love salad, but I love meat too

Fact or fiction – FICTION Once I read in one of Alice Walker’s books that in fiction the facts are never finished, everyone can fill in what s/he see in the story or continue themselves. In non-fiction the story is sort of finished. Because I like facts, but also dreaming, maybe that’s why my stories have a mingling of facts and fiction :).

Music or silence – SILENCE I like music, but I need silence too. I think I would miss silence more than I would miss music.

Indoor or outdoor – INDOOR when I was young, my choice definitely would be ‘outdoor’, now I think I love indoor more 🙂

Ocean view or mountains – OCEAN VIEW Watching the movements of the sea is like rocking your soul. Though I like mountains too

Books or movies MOVIES

E-book or print – Print for picture books, for other books I prefer now e-books

Teach or learn – LEARN I love them both. But when I first learn, teaching follow

Romance or crime – CRIME I love romance, but for reading it is so destressing to read a crime story

AUTHOR LINKS

Books:

Margot Gets an Unexpected Visit

Hook: A children’s tale where nature photography, friendship, diversity, fun, education and ice hockey come together.

Blurb: As all groundhogs, Margot doesn’t like to have others around her. Certainly not humans. But is this also the case when she meets up with two little girls? You’ll find out in this book.
You will also enjoy the unique and touching photo-images of nature in Quebec, and an unpredictable anecdote on the special haircut for ice hockey fans.

Asin: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01E0FL2HK

Amazon smartly: http://smarturl.it/e7uowx

Universal booklink: https://books2read.com/u/mZ58yJ

ISBN: 978-1532877650

Groundhog Secrets – Everything You Always wanted to Know about Woodchucks

Hook: Discover the secret world of the groundhog through the eyes of Margo the woodchuck while gaining a close-up view of wildlife in whimsical photo illustrations.

Blurb: Do you want to know more about the woodchuck? Then this book packed with information about groundhogs (who are also called woodchucks) is for you! Margot the woodchuck reveals all her secrets. She describes how groundhogs are born, what they look like and who is in their family. She talks about how they fill their tummies in summer and autumn, to store fat for the long winter months. Even medical doctors and scientists study the groundhog hibernation. Find out why in this fascinating illustrated book.

Asin: B071Z35TDB

Amazon smartly: http://smarturl.it/0psllg

Universal booklink: https://www.books2read.com/u/m2oJNG

ISBN: 978-1546813033

Website: https://lievesnellings.wordpress.com

Social networks:

https://www.amazon.com/author/snellings
http://www.facebook.com/FotoBoekLieveSnellings
https://twitter.com/SnellingsLieve
https://www.instagram.com/lievesnellings
https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/14186089.Lieve_Snellings

Readers Review Room Author of the month October 2017: http://readersreviewroom.com/author-of-the-month/lieve-snellings/
BookGoSocial Top Voted Children’s Author 2017

5 Comments »